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Great to hear of this tool Julia, it shows great potential and would be extremely for our work, hopefully we can contribute to the development also.

At Transparency International we are establishing a specialised programme on Mining & Corruption and held the foundation workshop in Cape Town around Indaba. A key aspect of Phase 1 and ongoing work will be an analysis of mining related corruption conducted by TI National Chapters in Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, PNG, Peru and Australia. We are currently developing the framework so would love to discuss this framework and contribute where possible. 

Aiofe, I'd also like to see the modified framework when it's available and/or discuss your work. 

Thanks, 

Thanks Aoife! We used the Rents to Riches paper as background for developing the framework. I would love to see the modified framework you developed. I will send you the draft Governance Assessment Framework. Thanks!

 

Hi Julia,

I am working as a Governance Consultant at theIDLgroup. We recently completed a piece of advisory work for a donor where we looked at how Barma et al's (2012) political economy framework on resource governance could be used by donors to predict how   different governance types were likely to be impacted by a resource boom. We modified the framework to make it easier to use for donors and practical for identifying key governance weaknesses in each country. This could potentially be useful for what you are trying to do. 

Barma et al's study can be accessed here: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2011/12/08/000333037_20111208233949/Rendered/PDF/659570PUB0EPI10737B0Rents0to0Riches.pdf

Thank you Ronald. You make some very useful observations about the 'will to do'. This is a real issue, and I must confess that sometimes I also experience the challenge of doing what needs to be done, knowing fully well the potential impediments to real reform. This is a problem within donor agencies as well constrained by resources and trying to determine how to leverage the limited capacity they have to impact change on the ground. We need some eternal optimists who believe that no matter how difficult and seemingly daunting the challenge, 'where there is a will there is a way'... 

Lars: Thanks for the links! I will review them thoroughly and get in touch with you to discuss further. Many thanks!

George: How do you foresee Ghana using the assessment framework? What are some of your ideas on tangible ways the framework could be used? Once it is completed, we are planning on piloting in selected countries. Ghana could be a good pilot - both for petroleum and for mining. I would be interested to know your thoughts on concrete entry points. 

A laudable initiative and it would be very interesting to the draft Framework.

In my view the greatest governance challenge is the frequent absence of will to actually do what needs to be done.  Not only the political will to make new policies and laws, even to 'build capacity' in institutions, but rather the will to DO what everybody knows needs to be done.  And not to just do tomorrow what was done yesterday, citing many reasons why it won't make a difference.  I have frequently come up against this feeling of inadequacy in institutions, where quite capable people believe they can't make a difference, that more powerful bosses would just reverse what they have done, that they might even be scolded or lose their jobs.

Another important issue surrounds what you have called the 'sub-national challenges'.  Local communities or regions may feel the brunt of the negative impacts of a project, while governments in a capital city far away decide what is best for the country as a whole, usually on an economic basis.  This would be a risk for all inhabitants of even very democratic countries, but in developing countries the sub-national democracy is not always as deep or effective as the national level of democracy may be.  In short, local communities may not get listened to, may be expected to suffer 'for the greater good' of the country.  And foreign companies (mining or oil or otherwise) are not supposed to enter into politics.

Hello Julia,

Are you familiar with the tools developed by Global Integrity? http://www.globalintegrity.org/. We have partnered with GI in Kenya and produced some pretty comprehensive information on governance and the implementation gap. The organization I work for also produced an interesting booklet on governance http://www.cipe.org/publications/detail/improving-public-governance-closing-implementation-gap-between-law-and-practice.

Let me know if I can provide you with further information.

 

 

Hello Julia,

The attempt for the framework is very timely, especially for us in Ghana. I am looking forward to its completion!